Category Politics

The Ratings Are Through the Roof!

Marco Polo describes a bridge, stone by stone. “But which is the stone that supports the bridge?” Kublai Khan asks. “The bridge is not supported by one stone or another,” Marco answers, “but by the line of the arch that they form.” Kublai Khan remains silent, reflecting. Then he adds: “Why do you speak to […]

The Weekly Bipartisan: Uniting Against Indefinite Detention

[Welcome to The Weekly Bipartisan, where we share instances of meaningful bipartisanship, on the Hill and elsewhere. This project seeks to shine a light on efforts to come together to find common ground and advance shared values in a political climate defined by polarization, an increasingly jaded citizenry, and vilification instead of constructive dialogue and debate. […]

Texas Bill to Protect Religious Child Welfare Service Providers

On Monday, the Texas legislature passed HB 3859, a bill affording private child welfare service providers with religious liberty protections. Like with many religious freedom issues today, supporters and opponents once again fight over the extent to which state government may offer protections for the free exercise of religion (or, as it is commonly called–”play in the […]

Imagine A Boot Stamping On A Human Face, Occasionally

George Orwell once pointed out that fascism, in contemporary usage, no longer held any meaning beyond “thing I do not like.” He published that essay in 1944. Matters have not improved much since. To clarify for the record: Fascism was a European movement of the 1920s and 1930s, particularly in Italy, in part in Spain. […]

“…But I Play One On TV.”

There’s an old cliché about the television star who becomes so deluded in his role he begins to believe he possesses the talents of his character in real life, and so the TV doctor attempts to stop a heart attack, the TV cop intervenes to stop a robbery, the TV lawyer advises friends on their […]

Federalism 2: The Revenge

In 1993, Congress passed the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act. Among its various initiatives, it provided for the creation of a national background check system by which to screen prospective gun purchasers. This created a dilemma, however: the United States is a mess of separate and overlapping jurisdictions, and most crime is dealt with at […]

David Hume, Rubber Stamps, and Cognitive Inequality

[Today we welcome our colleague Reilly Stephens as our newest contributor here at LDB. Our agreement with him states that he will be providing insight and analysis of law, politics, and whatever else we demand, except for modern interpretive dance and ERISA, about which he knows nothing…he was particular about those last two for some […]

Justice Gorsuch’s Greatest Hits – Circuit Edition

Justice Gorsuch is just about to start his tenure on the highest court in the land, but he’s already got quite a few great quotes among his many opinions during his time on the Tenth Circuit. Here, in no particular order, is a sneak preview of things to come. *********************************** “In enlightenment theory and hard won […]

Moore v. Trump – Evangelicals’ Ongoing Existential Crisis

Up front, I would like to observe that I am not intimately familiar with the following situation, and so any reflections based on what information I have should be understood as based on publicly-available information. That being said, regardless of what may be true behind-the-scenes, I still feel the points made herein are valid regardless […]

The Feinstein Paradox

Judge Gorsuch’s nomination hearings began today. Much could be said given all that was uttered from the dais, but I’ll keep my powder dry regarding most of it. I would like to focus on one highlight, however – I’ll call it the Feinstein Paradox.* In her opening statement, Senator Feinstein highlighted “the 14 key cases […]