I will save you and you shall be a blessing. –Zechariah 8:13 From everyone to whom much has been given, much will be required; and from the one to whom much has been entrusted, even more will be demanded. –Luke 12:48 With great power comes great responsibility. —Benjamin Parker As we explain elsewhere, we here […]

The kitsch business has slowed down as of late, but every now and again a check comes in from our store for the various wares sold during the prior period. That happened a few days ago, when a check came in for over $100. As is custom, we take that money and head on over […]

On this day in 1787, the Constitutional Convention finished its work, and those involved in the creation of the new charter to govern the recently liberated colonies gathered once more to sign the document in order to then take it to the people in the several states for consideration and ratification. Much has changed in […]

[S]tare decisis is neither an inexorable command, nor a mechanical formula of adherence to the latest decision, especially in constitutional cases. If it were, segregation would be legal . . . . —Citizens United v. FEC, 558 U.S. 310, 377 (2010) (Roberts, C.J., concurring) (cleaned up) ************************** The decision was 7-1. In the ensuing decades, it had been […]

All we say to America is, “Be true to what you said on paper.” –Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (April 3, 1968) ***************************** Our nation began with what is and will ever remain one of the most eloquent pronouncements of natural right ever uttered: We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are […]

Article I, Section One vests “[a]ll legislative Powers” in Congress.[1] Among other things, this means that “[e]xcept in a few areas constitutionally committed to the Executive Branch, the basic policy decisions governing society are to be made by the Legislature.”[2] Congress cannot delegate the power to make the law to another entity (or, for that […]

“[A] court . . . which should allow a change in public sentiment to influence it in giving to a written constitution a construction not warranted by the intention of its founders, would be justly chargeable with reckless disregard of official oath and public duty . . . . What a court is to do, therefore, is to declare the law as written, leaving it to the people themselves to make such changes as new circumstances may require.”

As President Donald Trump prepares to appoint a second Supreme Court justice, the national dialogue has been saturated with gossip over what judicial philosophy the next nominee might bring to the bench. For legal nerds, SCOTUS nominations are what the World Cup is to soccer fans: the one time everyone else cares about your passion. […]

[T]he interest of parents in the care, custody, and control of their children is perhaps the oldest of the fundamental liberty interests recognized by this Court. –Troxel v. Granville, 530 U.S. 57, 65 (2000) (plurality op.) *********************************** In In the Interest of H.S., a Minor Child, the Texas Supreme Court concluded that anyone in a “parent-like role” […]

It is most true that this Court will not take jurisdiction if it should not; but it is equally true that it must take jurisdiction if it should. The judiciary cannot, as the legislature may, avoid a measure because it approaches the confines of the Constitution. We cannot pass it by because it is doubtful. […]

[Eds. Note: We’re pleased to be able to share this piece by John Ehrett, who joins us as a guest author] Most government buildings are pathologically ugly. By “government buildings,” I don’t mean iconic structures like the Lincoln Memorial or the White House. I mean the garden-variety government buildings that sit in medium- to large-sized […]