The 1905 Supreme Court case Lochner v. New York has long been a lightning rod for the claim that unelected judges have no place in our Constitutional system striking down laws purporting to ensure public health and safety. The periled precedent played its part this week as UT Law student Noah Horwitz dutifully deployed it against […]

Eminent domain—It is a term evocative of aristocracy from a bygone era, one that should be written in gilded script that graces an old regal manuscript. This word association is perhaps accurate given what the term represents in legal parlance: the government’s ability to expropriate the territory of its citizens. In the United States, this […]

Last November, then Vice President Elect Mike Pence took his family to a production of the Broadway musical Hamilton. The Broadway audience being what it is, his entrance was met with a spattering of boos. The Broadway cast being what it is, they took the opportunity to make a special entreaty to the victorious candidate […]

Good morning; let’s talk about tax policy!  One of the ways Senator Bernie Sanders has offered to finance his suggested health care plan is a wealth tax. A wealth tax does what it says on the box: taxes assets, as opposed to our current tax structure, which taxes income. This is far from the first […]

Introduction It should come as no surprise given the size of the United States Code, but every now and again two federal statutes point crossways. Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis presents the Court with one such conflict between the Federal Arbitration Act on the one hand and the National Labor Relations Act on the other. […]

Yesterday, we published a post I wrote about the troubling state of civic life in today’s environment of identity politics. The same morning, Above the Law published a piece that illustrates the follies of tribalism I intended to condemn in my post. In what is either an attempt to create controversial click-bait or simply a […]

Reflections on division in the United States.

In a combined appeal involving the Department of Labor’s (DOL) contested construction of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), a panel of the Ninth Circuit recently held that DOL’s interpretation of regulations implementing FLSA was not entitled to Auer deference, ruling in favor of the defendants, a number of restaurants who had been sued by employees […]

I have a very immodest proposal: let’s flip the presumption of Auer deference so that the regulated party, rather than the regulatory agency, gets the benefit of any ambiguity in a regulation? We’ll start here, but it should be noted for the record that the same logic extends to Chevron deference also. Think about it. In contracts, this […]

On September 13, 1810, William Cushing passed away in Scituate, MA. Cushing had served his nation in a number of important and prestigious roles: Chief Justice on the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts during the Revolution, one of the six original Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States (where he served for […]